Newsflash: Napster has once again risen from the grave. Rhapsody – you know, that music service that old people use with their dial-up modems – recently announced that it was going to adopt the Napster name and DJ/cat logo for its service. Will it allow illegal file sharing? Will the guys from Metallica yell “you rotten kids stop listening to our music and get off our lawn” from the rocking chairs on their porch? Will it take the internet by storm?

Nope. It will still be an also-ran music service that gets absolutely pummeled by more modern services like Spotify and Pandora and iHeart Radio. In fact Rhapsody’s product isn’t even what makes this a compelling story. What makes it newsworthy is that 17 or so years after the real Napster went online, its brand is still around, even though its code, content and business model have changed repeatedly and drastically (Best Buy even owned the name for a few years, though nobody seemed to notice).

Does that mean that coding is irrelevant? Far from it. The only reason that Napster became a household word is because its programming (and the premise behind it) was fairly revolutionary. It took peer-to-peer sharing to another level.

But it wouldn’t still be around today if it was only the code. After all, a court order took the code offline a really long time ago. No, success on the internet depends on equal parts brains and charisma. Napster had a good product, a memorable logo, an interesting spokesperson (founder Sean Parker) and great timing. The alchemical result of mixing those ingredients was magic.

Here at {code} Roadies, our code and the content it delivers are written to make your designs look great, your ideas come to life and your brand stand out. If we do our job right, your branding efforts transcend your website. The code is critical – but it’s only the beginning. I’d like to think that this big picture thinking is what sets {code} Roadies apart.